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NMAHP Development Framework

 

The Scottish Trauma Network (STN) are pleased to announce the publication of the Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions (NMAHP) NMAHP Development Framework for Major Trauma.

This is hosted within the Education and Training section of the STN website;

https://www.scottishtraumanetwork.com/our-work/education-learning/

The NMAHP Development Framework for Major Trauma will be used by NMAHP practitioners caring for major trauma patients in any in-hospital setting at local, regional and national levels for identifying, planning and supporting learning needs, identifying career pathways and enhancing workforce planning.

This framework is the result of collaborative working between NHS Education for Scotland (NES) and the STN, working closely with NMAHP practitioners and consulting with the STN Education and Workforce group. It is aligned to the already published NES NMAHP Development Framework.

It is currently for registered practitioners at education levels 5-8 with the Healthcare Support Worker element following later in the year, in conjunction with the national HCSW commission.

2021-22 Annual Report

Introduction by National Clinical Lead

Annual report time arrives once again, and in this new style of presentation my superlatives for the work of all who support the continued work, development and improvements of the Scottish Trauma Network will be brief. This is just as well, as the resources of my thesaurus begin to abate.

It is now 5 years since we convened and commenced our program of work to build and implement an entirely new clinical network of acute care and long-term rehabilitation for Scotland’s most seriously injured. August 30th 2021 witnessed the completion of Phase I with delivery of the fully operational end product. At time of writing, we run smoothly and successfully in the best traditions of “National Collaborative Pragmatism”.

All of this achieved of course, against the backdrop of complications presented to us by the pandemic. A remarkable achievement now recognised and acclaimed at the highest levels of the NHS, the Scottish Government, and national and international media.

This hard-earned and well-deserved reputation requires stiffening of the sinews and strengthening of resolve to be maintained, for us to progress further as we contribute well beyond our remit to the Remobilisation of the NHS in Scotland.

Thus, now begins Phase II, where we plan to tell the story using data, to raise standards for the future, and to demonstrate the sustained improved outcomes for patients, their families, their communities and the nation as a return on the visionary investment of these past 5 years.

The full report can be seen here

Martin McKechnie

National Clinical Lead

Scottish Trauma Network

STAG Annual Report

The eighth report by the Scottish Trauma Audit Group (STAG) since 2011 can be found on the Public Health Scotland website. Compliance with a subset of the Scottish Trauma Network Key Performance Indicators, case-mix adjusted mortality and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) are within part one of the report. Part two and three provide a comprehensive summary of injuries and the patient journey for both adults and paediatrics respectively.

2020-21 Annual Report

Introduction from National Clinical Lead

2020 – 21 has been variously difficult, challenging, interesting and rewarding across the many spheres of activity, development and progress for the Scottish Trauma Network (STN). This Annual Report sits alongside and complements the imminent publication of the Scottish Trauma Audit Group’s (STAG) Annual Report for the same period. They both reveal and explore much of the data, operational and patient-centred clinical stories around this past year’s extraordinary activity within the Network. Set against the pandemic backdrop, the strong message coming from these reports is one of resilience, maintained high-quality patient care and an above-and-beyond spirit of collaboration and pragmatism on a national scale. That key performance and outcome measures have been delivered, yet alone maintained and improved in several areas, is worthy of acknowledgment and appreciation. The reports further explore much of our presentation and discussion at the Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Select Committee in January 2021.

There are many examples to celebrate, but I take this opportunity to highlight and express admiration and gratitude to the Scottish Ambulance Service, the ScotSTAR and EMRS transport and retrieval arms, and the newer Advanced Paramedics in Critical Care red teams therein. Their relentless and complex work in supporting and enabling the pandemic response across trauma and all related critical care services has been inspiring. The STN and patients are thankful to them beyond words. These thanks are expressed in equal measure to all staff and services recruited in good faith and optimism to the STN, yet who found themselves redeployed and reallocated to support the response in other vital areas such as Emergency Departments, Trauma Wards which became Covid High Dependency Units and Critical Care areas, and Theatres.

More interesting still is what much of this tells us about the improved access we now have to data and patient-reported measures. These are the mainstays of why the STN does what it does. With STN Trauma and STAG coordinators now embedded in our hospitals, we are able to reach more broadly across and deeper into the care of trauma patients than ever before. The resulting information and its analysis will further “tell the story” as we move beyond delivery of Phase I later this year, with the opening of the Major Trauma Centres at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow, and the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, and the operational delivery of the Regional Networks in the West and South East of Scotland. These final pieces of the jigsaw will complete the national picture alongside the MTCs at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary and Ninewells Hospital in Dundee opened in 2018, supporting all the component services within our Regional Networks.

It is to be hoped that by the time of next year’s report we will be able to reflect upon a time of challenge and change with a more secure feel for what the immediate and medium-term future holds for our service. This learning allows us to reenergise and reconvene with strength, determination and the confidence that comes from surmounting such a significant hurdle.

Every person and every collaborative and linked service involved, described and embraced within the following pages is deserving of the greatest of gratitude and recognition. We are indebted to you all.

The full report can be seen here.

Martin McKechnie

National Clinical Lead

Scottish Trauma Network

Keep Cycling!

While there are fewer other activities to divert us and our children during this period, it’s great to see everyone getting out on their bikes. It’s such a great way to get out and about and good for our general health and wellbeing. Safety equipment, such as helmets, can be helpful to keep their heads safe in case of a tumble, especially for children who are a bit less stable on their bikes. Mark Lilley, one of the Major Trauma Co-ordinators in Glasgow put together this short video with some advice when we had some glorious weather during lockdown last Spring/Summer. Keep cycling!

 

Image credit: Creative Commons, Pressedienst Fahrrad

STN Annual Report 2019/20

Executive Summary from Martin McKechnie

2019-20 was another significant and progressive year for the Scottish Trauma Network. There is much to champion, and more to come in what is shaping up to be an exciting 2020-21. That this has been achieved latterly against the backdrop of the Covid-19 pandemic, with the many necessary twists and turns in expectation, guidance, policy, redeployment and operational initiative across all our facets and collaborations within NHS Scotland, is yet further evidence of the energy, resilience and pragmatism shown by all members of our flourishing STN family.

By this time next year we expect to have delivered a fully operational STN, by opening our final Regional Major Trauma Centres at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow, and at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh. This will complete the national picture alongside the MTCs at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary and Ninewells Hospital in Dundee, and support all the component services within our Regional Networks. To achieve this landmark against the turbulence of 2020 will indeed be cause for celebration.

The success of the Scottish Ambulance Service’s Trauma Desk, and its Covid-prompted transformation into a national Critical Care Desk, as well as that of ScotSTAR North operating from its new base at Aberdeen Airport, allows us to look at further developments in Red Team prehospital Critical Care delivery across Scotland.

‘The Trauma App’ collaboration between STN, the emergency department representatives from across the STN, EMQUIRE, daysix, the Digital Health & Care Institute and Innovate UK, continues to attract international interest as that project enters final development and simulation phases.

Our new Research and Innovation Group has begun its work to tell the story of the STN via data. As well as the R&I Group’s clinical research remit, there will be an assessment of the health and economic impact of the Scottish Government’s major investment in the STN.

In a new and exciting development to help tell this story, Firecrest Films, a Glasgow-based independent television production company, has been commissioned by Channel 4 to produce a flagship 6-part primetime documentary series on the work, patients and staff of the Scottish Trauma Network. It is hoped that filming will start in 2021.

Finally, as testament to the way the STN has developed and at the Cabinet Secretary for Health and Sport’s request, our model is being applied to support the development of several of the new Strategic Networks, where we are finding particular synergies with the Veterans and Health in Justice Networks.

Yet more interesting times ahead for the STN.

The STN Annual Report 2019/20 can be found HERE

GESTS 2019

Since its inaugural launch in February 2014 GESTS has developed a growing following and an international reputation.

This two-day symposium brings together a range of nationally and internationally renowned expertise and focuses on key messages and practical tips in emergency surgery and trauma care.

The event is designed to concentrate the most insightful updates into a highly focused and well-structured programme with opportunities to ask key questions. GESTS will not only consolidate your existing knowledge, but give you access to expert opinion, topical debate and key updates. Delegate feedback has repeatedly praised the informal nature of the meeting, the short, focused, talks, the case based panel discussions, and the range of speakers.

GESTS 2018 was the fastest selling event to date and we expect 2019 to sell out even faster

All the GESTS’ trademarks will be retained including short, exciting and clinically-relevant presentations, ample opportunity to challenge the faculty during open and lively discussion, practical advice to get you and your patient out of trouble and several lifetimes’ experience distilled down to key take home messages. We look forward to seeing you in Glasgow in February 2019!

For further details, download the full event flyer, and to book check out the GESTS website.

ADVANCED PARAMEDIC TEAM LAUNCHES AT QEUH

Welcome to Alastair and Jeff, part of the new advanced paramedics team based out of the QEUH, Glasgow, which launched on Monday. A key part of the Scottish Trauma System.

Alastair and Jeff started with SAS in December 2017, with funding through the Scottish Trauma Network, they will provide support to paramedics answering more complex calls across the West of Scotland.  This pilot will test the benefit of having advanced paramedics, with the intention of rolling out teams across Scotland over the next few years.